DentalCare monthly updates

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS




29/Jun/2017

Today, more than 44 million Americans wear dentures. Most new dentures have to go through an initial period of adaptation or “breaking in”. In the beginning, you may experience some of the following:

  • A feeling of fullness. It is normal to feel different and awkward at first with your new dentures. Your appearance has most likely undergone a slight change. With time, patience, and some training of your facial muscles, things will soon begin to feel more natural.
  • A gagging sensation. Many times dentures and partials give difficulty in the beginning stages while swallowing. With time, this will improve.
  •  Difficulty in speaking. Careful practice and repetition in pronouncing those hard to say words will make your transition period easier. You must also learn to control a tendency to tongue‐thrusting, which may dislodge the denture.
  • Difficulty eating. Start with soft foods or those that are easy to chew. More difficult foods that are fibrous (steak) or hard (apples) will require a gradual learning curve. To bite foods that normally require the front teeth, try spreading the tongue against the back of the upper denture to keep it in place. Always try to eat with food on both sides to keep the denture balanced. Also, try chewing vertically (up and down) rather than horizontally (side to side).
  •  Possible Soreness. Soreness from uneven pressure on the gums due to healing or irregularities may develop at any time and is not unusual. This can be corrected with a simple adjustment appointment.
  •  Excessive salivation.
  • Looseness. If you have had teeth extracted immediately prior to placement of the denture or partial, it may feel loose, due to gum shrinkage from the normal healing process. A process called a “Reline” may be needed after healing is complete.

Cleaning your Dentures or Partials

Cleaning your denture or partial should be an everyday habit to keep your smile beautiful. Plaque and tartar buildup can form on dentures just like it does on your natural teeth. Failure to remove your denture for proper cleaning can result in staining of the teeth, mouth odor, or possible gum irritation. Here are a few simple tips that may help:

  • Dentures can break, so always fill the sink with water, and clean them over the sink, just in case you drop them. Alternatively, they can be cleaned over a towel-lined counter top.
  •  Don’t use hot or boiling water; the denture material may warp.
  •  Don’t use rough household products, such as bleach to clean your dentures. These products sometimes contain abrasive particles that may scratch your denture or partial.
  •  Don’t use abrasive regular toothpaste. It could scratch the prosthesis resulting in poor cosmetics. Use the brush provided with dish soap to keep your denture clean. While you sleep at night, soak your denture or partial in a cleanser such as Fixodent, Efferdent, Polident, or any other denture cleaner that is recommended by our office.
  •  Brush your gums, tongue, and palate with a regular toothbrush to remove plaque, bacteria, and to stimulate good circulation.

Be sure to have your dentures checked at least once annually as changes in the mouth, such as shrinkage and bone loss will occur. Careful maintenance and routine checkups will help to slow down these changes. If you have a partial and some remaining teeth, an exam and cleaning should be scheduled every 6 months.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.

 


29/Jun/2017

  1. Scaling and root planning (“Deep Cleaning”) is a non- surgical treatment of periodontal disease. The purpose of the treatment is to remove bacterial plaque and tartar from around teeth and under the gum line. The goal is to produce clean, smooth teeth and roots, which will promote healing of the inflammation and infection of gum disease.
  2. After scaling and root planing, avoid eating anything on the area being treated for two hours or until the dental anesthetic has worn off completely. Avoid any hard “chippy” foods such as tortilla chips, potato chips, popcorn, or seeds for the next several days.
  3. It is normal for your gums to feel slightly sore or an “achy” feeling for the next 3 days after your scaling and root planing treatment. If local anesthesia was used to numb the area during treatment, you may feel slight stiffness in your jaw when opening after the numbness wears off. It is also normal for your teeth to be sensitive to cold and/or hot foods and liquids after the treatment.
  4. To help soothe the area, rinse your mouth 2-3 times a day with warm salt water rinses. Use one teaspoon of salt for every 3 ounces of water.
  5. Resume your home care regimen immediately, but be gentle with the area recently treated.
  6. Refrain from smoking for 24 to 48 hours after scaling and root planing. Tobacco will delay healing of the tissues.
  7. You may take a non-aspirin pain reliever for any tenderness or discomfort. Take ibuprofen (Advil) or Tylenol unless you are allergic or have medical conditions that prevent taking these medications.
  8. If you have persistent discomfort or swelling that occurs after scaling and root planing, contact the office for instructions as soon as possible.
  9. As the tissues heal, some temporary sensitivity to cold may occur. Use a desensitizing toothpaste (such as Sensodyne®), fluoride gel (such as Clinpro®), or fluoride rinse (ACT Fluoride Rinse®) frequently (at least 4 times/day) for 1 to 2 weeks. Also, the cleaner the teeth are kept, the less sensitive they will be.
  10. Faithfully use any other oral hygiene aids that have been recommended (floss, Perio-Aid®, rubber tip, Sonicare®, Proxabrush®, Clinpro® fluoride, Peridex® mouthrinse, etc).

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.


29/Jun/2017

  1. You need to have a permanent filling or a crown placed on your tooth within 1 MONTH of the root canal being completed. If this is not done, the tooth is very likely to fracture or to develop new decay underneath the temporary filling which may cause your root canal to fail. You will be responsible for all costs incurred if you fail to follow this instruction.
  2. Do not use the tooth to bite down on anything hard (peanuts, pretzels, ice, etc.) until the permanent filling/crown has been placed on the tooth. Again, the tooth is prone to fracture and if you bite down on anything too hard or crunchy you may crack the tooth.
  3. Some minor discomfort in the area is normal following the root canal. It is normal for the tooth to be uncomfortable for 2-3 days after today’s treatment. Sometimes, depending on the circumstances, the tooth and surrounding tissues may remain sore for a few weeks post treatment. The three most common reasons for pain are:
  • Sore jaw joint from having your mouth open for a prolonged time.
  • Sore muscle from the injection site.
  • Sore gum from the rubber dam placement.

4.Take your pain medication before the numbness wears off. All of the above scenarios should be  handled with over the counter medication, primarily. We recommend you take: 600-800 mg Ibuprofen (3-4 over the counter pills of Advil or Motrin or generic equivalent) every 6 hours for the next 2 days.

OR

(if unable to take ibuprofen)

1000mg Acetaminophen (2 extra strength Tylenol or generic equivalent) every 6-8 hours for the next 2 days. 90% of the time this is enough to handle the discomfort. If it is not, please contact our office.

5.If you are given any prescription medications related to this treatment please take them as instructed by your  doctor. Please keep in mind that when taking antibiotics for pain and/or swelling due to infection, it generally  takes at least 48 hours for the antibiotics to become effective before the symptoms and/or swelling begin to subside.

6.You may floss and brush your tooth as normal, unless told otherwise by the doctor.

FLARE-UPS

Although about 95% of root canals cause very little to no discomfort after the treatment is completed, there are about 5% of cases which can cause significant pain. These are commonly referred to as “flare-ups.” They mostly occur on badly infected teeth, teeth that are extremely irritated, or teeth that have a history of prior treatment. Sometimes, however, they occur randomly, even on patients that have had several root canals done previously without any problems.

If you have a flare-up you may experience moderate to severe pain, swelling (can get as large as a golf ball), bruising, throbbing, and general discomfort, which usually begins a few hours after treatment and may last 2 to 3 days.

Please contact our office if you experience any of these symptoms and we will do everything we possibly can to get you some relief. You may be prescribed antibiotics, stronger pain medication, a steroid, and/or you may be asked to come to the office to receive further therapy.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.

 


29/Jun/2017

  1. Your child’s tooth has had the nerve partially removed from one of the primary or baby teeth and a permanent restoration has been placed over the top.
  2. Some minor discomfort in the area is normal following the pulpotomy. It is normal for the tooth to be uncomfortable for 2-3 days after today’s treatment. However, most children do not complain of pain following this procedure.
  3. When your child receives a nerve treatment it is usually not necessary to prescribe any pain medication. Children that do experience discomfort usually do fine with either Tylenol or Motrin (follow the directions on the bottle)
  4. If you are given any prescription medications related to this treatment please take them as instructed by your doctor. Please keep in mind that when taking antibiotics for pain and/or swelling due to infection, it generally takes at least 48 hours for the antibiotics to become effective before the symptoms and/or swelling begin to subside.
  5. Your child has been given an injection of local anesthesia to numb his/her teeth in order for us to work on them. Your child’s mouth (tooth, lip & tongue) will be numb for approximately 2 to 3 hours. It is imperative that you watch your child and have him or her not chew on their lip or tongue as this may cause serious damage and profound pain later on.
  6. You/your child may floss and brush their teeth as normal, unless told otherwise by the doctor.
  7. Your child should have his/her diet limited to soft foods for 2 hours following the dental procedure to prevent biting the lip or tongue while numb. The following foods are acceptable: milk shake, ice cream, pudding, jello, soup, mashed potatoes, noodles, yogurt or any other foods of this consistency.

FLARE-UPS

Following a pulpotomy of a primary/baby tooth, the nerve has been partially removed and the remaining portion can become agitated and hyper-excitable. This state can lead to a heightened sense of pain and sensation on the tooth. These are commonly referred to as “flare-ups.” They mostly occur on badly infected teeth, teeth that are extremely irritated, or teeth that have a history of prior treatment. Sometimes, however, they occur randomly, even on patients that have previously been without any problems.

If your child has a flare-up they may experience moderate to severe pain, swelling (can get as large as a golf ball), bruising, throbbing, and general discomfort, which usually begins a few hours after treatment and may last 2 to 3 days.

Please contact our office if your child experiences any of these symptoms and we will do everything we possibly can to get them some relief. He/She may be prescribed antibiotics, stronger pain medication, and/or you may be asked to come to the office to receive further therapy including possible extraction.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.


29/Jun/2017

  1. You need to return for completion of the root canal and permanent restoration on the tooth that has been treated with a pulpotomy. If this is not done, the tooth is very likely to fracture, to develop new decay underneath the temporary filling, or become re-infected which may cause your tooth to become unrestorable or cause a flare up. You will be responsible for all costs incurred if you fail to follow this instruction.
  2. Do not use the tooth to bite down on anything hard (peanuts, pretzels, ice, etc.) until the root canal is completed and the permanent filling/crown has been placed on the tooth. Again, the tooth is prone to fracture and if you bite down on anything too hard or crunchy you may crack the tooth.
  3. Some minor discomfort in the area is normal following the pulpotomy. It is normal for the tooth to be uncomfortable for 2-3 days after today’s treatment.
  4. Take your pain medication before the numbness wears off. All of the above scenarios should be handled with over the counter medication, primarily. We recommend you take: 600-800 mg Ibuprofen (3-4 over the counter pills of Advil or Motrin or generic equivalent) every 6 hours for the next 2 days.

        OR

(if unable to take ibuprofen) 1000mg Acetaminophen (2 extra strength Tylenol or generic equivalent)every 6-8 hours for the next 2 days. 90% of the time this is enough to handle the discomfort. If it is not, please contact  our office.

5.If you are given any prescription medications related to this treatment please take them as instructed by your doctor. Please keep in mind that when taking antibiotics for pain and/or swelling due to infection, it generally takes at least 48 hours for the antibiotics to become effective before the symptoms and/or swelling begin to subside.

6.You may floss and brush your teeth as normal, unless told otherwise by the doctor.

FLARE-UPS

Following a pulpotomy of a permanent tooth, the nerve and possible infection have been partially removed and the remaining portion can become agitated and hyper-excitable. This state can lead to a heightened sense of pain and sensation on the tooth. These are commonly referred to as “flare-ups.” They mostly occur on badly infected teeth, teeth that are extremely irritated, or teeth that have a history of prior treatment. Sometimes, however, they occur randomly, even on patients that have had several root canals done previously without any problems.

If you have a flare-up you may experience moderate to severe pain, swelling (can get as large as a golf ball), bruising, throbbing, and general discomfort, which usually begins a few hours after treatment and may last 2 to 3 days.

Please contact our office if you experience any of these symptoms and we will do everything we possibly can to get you some relief. You may be prescribed antibiotics, stronger pain medication, a steroid, and/or you may be asked to come to the office to receive further therapy.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.

 

 

 


29/Jun/2017

  • Do not remove the denture for 24 hours. The denture is acting as a bandage over the extraction area, promoting healing, and any discomfort will most likely not be relieved by removing the denture. In addition, swelling following removal may make replacing the denture either impossible or extremely painful.
  • Do not attempt any chewing during the first 24 hours. Instead, take plenty of nourishing liquids, such as Ensure.
  • Some “oozing” of blood from under the denture us not uncommon, and if minor, is no cause for alarm.
  • Minor “bite” discrepancies may be noticed. These will be corrected at subsequent appointments.
  • Initial appearance and feeling will be affected by the anesthesia and will be only temporary.
  • Be sure to return for your recall appointments. Your dentist will remove your denture at this time and make adjustments as needed. This recall is very important.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.


29/Jun/2017

  • Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.
  • Children should be observed until the anesthesia has worn off. Due to the strange feeling of the anesthetic, many children chew on the inside of their cheeks, lips and tongue which can cause serious damage.
  • Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure from this procedure. This is completely normal. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure sensitivity will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better, (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine, and there is no need for concern.
  • Once the anesthesia has worn off, if you feel as though any of the teeth we have worked on are hitting first when you bite down, please give our office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted.
  • The gum tissue could have been irritated during the procedure and may be sore for a few days. The anesthetic injection site may also feel sore or bruised.
  • With silver fillings, you should not chew hard foods or chew directly on the new fillings for the first 24 hours. If possible, chew only on the opposite side of your mouth. Composite (white) fillings set up right away and can be chewed on as soon as the anesthetic wears off.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.

 


29/Jun/2017

Rest:

  • Rest quietly with your head elevated for the remainder of the day.
  • Always get up slowly from a reclined position to prevent dizziness
  • Limit physical activity for the first 24 hours and avoid excessive exertion for the first 72 hours.
  • Healing will occur much faster with rest!

Ice:

  • As soon as possible, place an ice pack on your face over the surgical area; 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off.
  • Use the ice pack for the first day following surgery. This will contribute to your comfort and minimize swelling.
  • Moist heat may be applied the day following surgery for added comfort.

Medication:

  • You should begin taking your pain medication BEFORE numbness wears off.If a pain reliever was called in to the pharmacy prior to your appointment, you may take it at our office if you have a driver. Otherwise, we can give you a non-narcotic pain reliever and you can take your prescription when you get home.
  • If an antibiotic was prescribed, take it as directed until it is ALL GONE.
  • Some pain medications may cause lightheadedness. Lying down will help this.
  • Some medications may cause an upset stomach. Taking these with food will lessen this side effect.

Bleeding:

  • Some red blood is expected in your saliva, however extensive bleeding should not occur. If such bleeding should occur, apply firm pressure with a moist gauze or moist teabag to the area for 30 minutes. If the bleeding does not subside, please call.

Swelling:

  • Some swelling often occurs and this is normal. However if swelling is excessive and is accompanied by fever, please call immediately.

Mouth-care:

  • Avoid rinsing, spitting or sucking through a straw for 24 hours after surgery. Blood is clotting and this will disturb the healing process.
  • Do not rinse with an over-the-counter mouthwash.
  • Tomorrow Rinse with a solution of ½ teaspoon of salt in a glass of water and resume brushing the remaining teeth as normal.

Eating:

  • Maintain a balanced diet.
  • Eat softer foods at first; such as pasta, eggs, fish, yogurt, soup, pudding and soft cooked vegetables.
  • Avoid extremes: very hot, very cold, sticky, crunchy, or acidic foods.

Fluids:

  • Fluids should be consumed as soon as possible. It is recommended that you drink 6 – 8 glasses of water during the day following surgery.
  • Avoid using a straw as it may cause suction, which may loosen the blood clot and cause bleeding.

Alcohol:

  • DO NOT CONSUME ALCOHOL WHILE ON PAIN MEDICATION.

Smoking:

  • We strongly advise NOT SMOKING after surgery. Smoking delays the healing, increases discomfort, and may encourage bleeding and infection in the surgical site.

Discoloration:

  • You may develop black and blue tissue areas. They are the result of bleeding into the tissue and will dissipate over time.

Impacted or Buried Teeth:

The following conditions are not uncommon with removal of these teeth:

  •  Difficulty in opening your mouth due to muscle spasms
  •  If a lower impaction was removed, you may have numbness of the lower lip or tongue, on the side from which the tooth was removed. This is almost always a temporary condition. It is not disfiguring, but just annoying. It may last from a few days to many months.
  • Sores may develop at the corners of the mouth and these should be covered with mild ointment such as Neo-Sporin.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.


29/Jun/2017

During your appointment today, one or more of your teeth was prepared for a crown or bridge. A temporary crown was fabricated for each prepared tooth. Temporary crowns are cemented with a temporary dental cement to allow for easy removal at your next appointment.

Temporary crowns are of universal size and shade. Your final restoration will be shaped and shaded to match your other teeth in both color and function.

Until your next appointment:

  • Whenever anesthesia is used, avoid chewing on your teeth until the numbness has worn off.
  • You may experience sensitivity to temperature and pressure, gum soreness and slight discomfort on the tooth / teeth; it should subside after the placement of final crown.
  • Avoid hard or sticky foods that may dislodge temporary crowns, such as:
    • Hard chewy breads such as bagels or French bread.
    • Chewy candies such as taffy, caramels or gum.
    • Hard crunchy foods such as corn nuts or popcorn kernels.
    • Do not bite into foods such as corn on the cob or apples.
  • If a temporary crown becomes loose or comes off, try to place it back onto the tooth and call the office at your convenience to get the crown re-cemented. Temporary cement is also available at most drug/grocery stores.
  • Rinse your mouth with Listerine™ mouthwash or warm salt water to minimize inflammation of the gum tissue.
  • Acrylic temporaries attract more bacterial plaque than natural teeth; therefore it is important to brush normally, at least three times a day. Floss at least once a day, but floss carefully and don’t pull up on the floss which may dislodge the temporary. Pull the floss out from the side of the temporary crown.
  • You may experience sensitivity to hot or cold foods or beverages after treatment.
  • Mild to moderate discomfort after dental work is common. An over the counter pain reliever/anti-inflammatory is recommended for patients who are able to tolerate them. (Tylenol™, Advil™, Aleve™, etc.) If discomfort increases, please call the office. If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent pain, or if you have any other questions or concerns, please call your doctor.

If you have any questions or concerns please call us.


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